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“We hired the best available coach,” Bergevin said, “and one of the league’s best.”

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Published on 13 Aug 2019 / In Film & Animation

“We hired the best available coach,” Bergevin said, “and one of the league’s best.”<br />Language aside, Julien is seen by many as an upgrade over Therrien.<br />“As a brand, the Canadiens trade a lot on their glory years,<br />and the glory years were French,” said Jean-Pierre Dupuis, a management professor who last year wrote a 168-page lamentation of the loss of the team’s French Canadian “chemistry,” which once claimed so many Stanley Cups.<br />It was the second time in 14 years that the Canadiens had fired Therrien —<br />and the second time they replaced him with Julien, whose previous tenure with the team amounted to three more seasons without a Stanley Cup.<br />Yet in Montreal, where issues of language and identity are never far below the surface, there is another, perhaps more fundamental reason<br />that Canadiens coaches must speak the language of Molière and Daft Punk.<br />Bowman grew up English in the hardscrabble Montreal neighborhood Verdun, picking up French from his neighbors<br />and at school and then perfecting it on his many bus rides between Quebec and Ottawa as a junior hockey coach<br />All three came up from the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League, and all were associated with the Canadiens at one time or another.<br />Players from the Q, as the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League is known, used to be a dominant demographic<br />in the league, churning out greats like Guy Lafleur, Mario Lemieux and Vincent Lecavalier.

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